20 August 2016   Leave a comment

Neoliberalism is roughly defined as strict adherence to a certain interpretation of market capitalism: a very  limited role for government in the economy enforced by policies that minimize both taxes and budget deficits.  It has been the dominant economic ideology since the 1980s for many countries and one implemented by the major economic organizations such as the IMF and the World Bank.  In the minds of many analysts (including me), it has been the major cause of the dramatic increase in income and wealth inequality in the world since that time.  It now appears as if the ideology of neoliberalism is finally being contested by some of its primary adherents.

In the 1950s, Britain waged a relentless war on the people of Kenya who had begun an uprising against colonial rule.  At that time people regarded what was termed the “Mau Mau Uprising” as a necessary war against primitive “savages”.  The world actually knew very little about what happened in Kenya because the British destroyed most of the records of the actions against the Kenyans.  But the tireless work of one historian, Caroline Elkins, has uncovered the brutality of the British behavior and her work ultimately led to a complete revision of our understanding of the horrible period of imperial savagery.

Britain in Kenya

The video of Omran Daqneesh has indeed gone viral, but, unlike earlier videos of atrocities in other conflicts, it has failed to move any of the great powers involved in the civil war to declare a cease-fire.  I am deeply troubled by the absence of outrage–it is the only way to move great powers if the great powers do not force each other to change policy.  It now appears as if the remaining innocents in Syria have been completely abandoned–in the same way the people of Rwanda were abandoned in 1994.

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Posted August 20, 2016 by vferraro1971 in World Politics

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